Information: (530) 577-3737  |  Emergency Dial 9-1-1

  • Welcome to Lake Valley Fire Protection District

    Welcome to Lake Valley Fire Protection District

    It is the mission of the Lake Valley Fire Protection District to protect our community, its people, and environment, by providing the highest level of fire suppression, emergency medical, disaster, hazardous materials, and fire prevention Read More
  • Operations Division

    Operations Division

    The mission of the Operations Division is to protect our community's people, property and environment by conducting aggressive emergency operations to mitigate threats caused by fire, medical emergencies, hazardous materials, and disasters. Read More
  • Fire Prevention Division

    Fire Prevention Division

    The mission of the fire prevention division is to protect our community's people, property and environment by preventing emergencies through providing inspection, plan checking, and fire and life safety education services. The Fire Prevention Division Read More
  • Fire Adapted Community

    Fire Adapted Community

    A Fire Adapted Community acknowledges and takes responsibility for its wildfire risk, and implements appropriate actions at all levels. Actions address resident safety, homes, neighborhoods, businesses and infrastructure, forests, parks, open spaces and other community assets Read More
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Job Announcement - Assistant Fuels Management Officer

Assistant Fuels Management Officer

$66,560 - $79,040 Annually

           

Summary Description

The primary responsibility of the Assistant Fuels Management Officer (AFMO) is to ensure that Lake Valley Fire District’s Fire and Fuels Division adequately meets various grant goals and objectives.  The individual occupying this position reports directly to the District’s Fuels Management Officer.  The grant funded position is “at will” and not supported by the general fund.  The position is full-time with health and retirement benefits for up to five years.

Duties and Responsibilities:  The following job duties are considered typical for a position in this classification.  Any single position may not perform all of these tasks, and/or may perform similar related tasks that are not specifically listed here.

  • Shall work under the supervision of District’s Fuels Management Officer
  • Shall be responsible for developing, implementing, and maintaining a comprehensive grant program that supports the Fire and Fuels Division within the District
  • Shall be the District’s liaison between various organizations and agencies, both public and private, on all matters related to fuels management within the District
  • Shall provide oversight and management of PTEIR contract and subsequent public outreach
  • Shall establish and maintain open communications with various homeowner associations and neighborhoods and provide education about defensible space regulations and recommendations
  • Shall provide forestry-related technical support, coordinate stakeholders, and perform development and layout of fuel reduction projects
  • Shall train in-house inspectors and any outside agency personnel providing defensible space inspections and tree marking for the District
  • Participates in the development and implementation of District’s goals, objectives, policies, procedures and priorities
  • Assumes management of administering contracts including negotiation of terms, tracking, and compliance with contractors, and consultants
  • Assists in accounting processes and grant compliance requirements for state, federal and privately funded grant programs
  • Assist with forecasting of various District funding sources
  • Assist in development of annual reporting requirements

Performs other duties as assigned.  This may include special assignments, duties, and functions as determined by the Fire Chief, Prevention Chief, or other staff within the Fire Administration

Education, Experience and Background:

  • Possess a Bachelor’s Degree (preferably in a Natural Resource Management related field)
  • Five or more years of experience in forestry, fuels management, fire suppression and/or a related field
  • Knowledge of, and experience with, forest health and wildland fire strategic planning, land use planning, public preparedness, and hazard mitigation issues, processes, standards, and proven solutions.
  • Personable, able to build relations based on trust, openness, and honesty
  • Proficient writer, and experience with grant applications
  • Knowledge of the following :
    • Lake Tahoe Basin Community Wildfire Protection Plan updated August 2015
    • California Forest Practice Rules
    • Lahontan WQCB Timber Harvest Plan
    • TRPA Substantial Tree Removal Requirements
    • Tahoe Fire and Fuels Team
    • Local organizations such as California Tahoe Conservancy, League to Save Lake Tahoe, and the Tahoe Resource Conservation District
  • Ability to establish the need for forest treatments, and prepare forest treatments in accordance with established practices
  • Ability to make sound decisions and effectively resolve conflicts

Ability To:

  • Establish and maintain effective working relationships with fire district staff, subordinates, other employees, the public, and outside agencies.
  • Maintain a high degree of organization, coordination, and attention to detail when implementing fuel management assignments.
  • To conduct public presentations and to represent the department in a professional and customer service orientated manner when dealing with community groups, other agencies, officials, the media, and the general public.

 

Minimum Requirements: Must possess a valid California or Nevada Class “C” driver’s license and show evidence of a favorable driving record. A DMV printout may be required prior to employment. Comply with Federal, State and local regulations and practices with regard to Equal Opportunity, sexual harassment, and a drug-free workplace.

 Additional Requirements:

  • A physical fitness examination is required every year pursuant to district policy.

Working Conditions: Work is performed in office (80%) and in the field or at meetings (20%). Office environment has natural and artificial lighting. Frequent interruptions to planned work activities will occur. Position will require flexible work hours when needed (occasional evenings and weekends). Incumbent may be required to use personal vehicle for work duties. District will reimburse mileage at the federal rate.

Physical Requirements: The physical requirements described here are representative of those that must be met by an employee to successfully perform the essential functions of the job. Ability to lift and carry up to 50 lbs and ability to sit (80%), walk or hike (20%) on a frequent basis; occasional bending, kneeling, squatting, reaching overhead, stretching, and climbing; strength, dexterity; coordination and vision to operate equipment, personal computer, and view video display terminal for frequent periods; and the ability to communicate on a telephone, via email, and in person.

Application Process:

Applications will be available at the Station #7 Administrative Office or by email request to labrado@caltahoefire.net.  Completed applications along with a cover letter, resume and copies of required certifications/degrees must be turned in to the Administrative Assistant/PIO no later than January 9th, 2017 at 1700 hrs.  No applications will be accepted after this date and time.  Applicants will be notified of their eligibility and given an interview date within one week of the application deadline.  Please contact Martin Goldberg with any questions regarding the position at (530) 577-3737 or by email at Goldberg@caltahoefire.net.

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Employment Opportunity

POSITION
Fuel Reduction/Chipper 
LOCATION
South Lake Tahoe, California
PRIMARY DUTIES
Chipper(s) will be responsible for operating the wood chipper and safely conducting slash disposal at the properties of homeowners within the areas of Lake Valley’s jurisdiction, Fallen Leaf Lake, and Alpine County. Chipper(s) will listen to voicemail messages left by homeowners and properly document all information necessary to provide prompt and professional service. Chipper(s) may conduct other duties as assigned.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
➢ Graduate from high school or successful certification of equivalency
➢ Minimum of 18 years of age
➢ Ability to perform manual labor, lift heavy loads, and work for extended periods of time
➢ Current and valid Nevada or California Driver’s License, Class C
DESIRED QUALIFICATIONS
➢ Knowledge of, and experience with, wood chipper, chainsaw and other equipment
➢ Familiarity driving large vehicles and experience with basic towing operations
➢ Ability to work safely and cooperatively in a group setting and work within a variety of working conditions
➢ Interpersonal skills are vital due to constant interaction with local homeowners
HOW TO APPLY
Applications are available at Lake Valley Fire Protection District Station 7 and on www.lakevalleyfire.org. Deliver completed applications and proof of desired qualifications to:

Lake Valley Fire Protection District Station 7
2211 Keetak Street
South Lake Tahoe, California 96150
ATTN: Martin Goldberg

FINAL FILING DATE
Applications are being accepted continuously until filled. Interviews will be conducted upon receipt of a complete application. Final deadline June 6th 2016.
CONTACT PERSON
Martin Goldberg
Fire and Fuels Division
(530) 577-3737 or goldberg@caltahoefire.net
FAX: (530) 577-3739

PLEASE NOTE
This position is a four-month limited term hourly position in the District, assigned to a guaranteed 40-hour workweek. Benefits and housing are not included. Hourly starting rate is $12.00-$14.40 per hour.

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New Program Creating Fire Adapted Community Network at Lake Tahoe

New Program Creating Fire Adapted Community Network at Lake Tahoe

Contact: Marybeth Donahoe, (530) 543-1501 ext. 114

 

South Lake Tahoe, Calif.The Tahoe Resource Conservation District (Tahoe RCD) is launching a new program to motivate and help communities to take action to lower their risk to the wildfire hazard in the Lake Tahoe Basin.

Supported with grant funding from CAL FIRE, the Tahoe RCD is building a Fire Adapted Community Network to educate locals and visitors about their vulnerability to wildfire and help them reduce their risk. In fire adapted communities, residents, visitors and agencies work together to take collaborative action to protect the community before, during, and after wildfires.

The network will engage individuals so they understand their wildfire threat and provide the tools they need to lower their risk. It will leverage educational resources, promote fire district services, and act as a liaison between community members and agencies, building partnerships between fire districts, communities, visitors, and agencies

The goal is to create a unified network of individuals who take responsibility and actions to reduce the wildfire risk in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Establishing fire adapted communities is the solution to protecting people’s lives and property and the environment from a catastrophic wildfire. 

Why are fire adapted communities important? Due to over 100 years of fire suppression, the natural role fire plays in creating healthy forests has been altered. The accumulation of hazardous fuels has increased within the understory of the forests. The accumulation of these fuels, weather conditions, and human behavior could lead to another catastrophic wildfire event in the Tahoe Basin, much like the previous Gondola, Washoe, and Angora fires.

Informed individuals, neighbors, and agencies reduce this wildfire risk by reducing fuels and modifying human behavior. It is important for people to create defensible space around there homes and within their neighborhoods, and to take other precautions to minimize their vulnerability to the inevitable wildfire threat. Fire adapted neighborhoods work closely with their local fire district or department to create and maintain a fire adapted community. This network of fire adapted communities will reduce the threat to wildfire and create resilient, knowledgeable communities in the Lake Tahoe Basin.

Be part of the solution! Spread the word about the wildfire threat and how to minimize the risk. Together we can make a difference! We need motivated individuals to partner on the efforts of creating a Tahoe Network of Fire Adapted Communities. You can be a leader in your residential community and personal network, or help with an established effort. Here are some tips on how to get involved:

  • Request a defensible space inspection from your local fire district or fire department by visiting www.Tahoe.LivingWithFire.info.
  • Contact Marybeth Donahoe at the Tahoe RCD for more information about how to volunteer. Find out about upcoming workshops and trainings and get the tools you need to raise awareness in your community. She can give you the information you need to either be a leader or a member within a local fire-adapted community. Call Marybeth at (530) 543-1501 ext. 114.

Catastrophic wildfire does not recognize boundaries or property lines. You can make a huge difference just by connecting with your neighbors and working together to minimize this risk for everyone. Be part of the solution, create unity and fire-adapt your community.

About the Tahoe Fire and Fuels Team

The Tahoe Fire and Fuels Team (TFFT) consists of representatives of Tahoe Basin fire agencies, CAL FIRE, Nevada Division of Forestry and related state agencies, University of California and Nevada Cooperative Extensions, the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, the U.S. Forest Service, conservation districts from both states, the California Tahoe Conservancy and the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board. Our Mission is to protect lives, property and the environment withinthe Lake Tahoe Basin from wildfire by implementing prioritized fuels reduction projects and engaging the public in becoming a Fire Adapted Community.

For more information, visit www.tahoefft.org.

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Winter is here. Be Prepared!

Winter is here and that means more family and friend gatherings inside the home. Whether in the kitchen, near the fireplace or stove it’s always a good idea to brush up on home safety tips.  

Before we gather around the fireplace or stove, remember these important safety tips:

  • Have a qualified professional install stoves, chimney connectors, and chimneys.
  • Stoves should have the label of an independent testing laboratory.
  • In wood stoves, burn only dry, seasoned wood. In pellet stoves, burn only dry, seasoned wood pellets.
  • Have your chimney and stove inspected and cleaned by a certified chimney sweep every fall just before heating season.
  • Clean the inside of your stove periodically using a wire brush.
  • Keep a close eye on children whenever a wood or pellet stove is being used. Remind them to stay at least three feet away from the stove.
  • Stoves need space. Keep anything that can burn at least three feet away from the stove.
  • Install and maintain carbon monoxide alarms and smoke alarms outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. For the best protection, interconnect the alarms. When one sounds, they all sound.
  • Allow ashes to completely cool before disposing them. Place ashes in a covered metal container. Keep the container at least 10 feet away from the home and other buildings.

No matter what type of device you use to heat your home, making sure that your heating devices and systems are in good working order is important. Many things can go wrong with heating equipment. Verify that everything you need to keep your home warm throughout the fall and winter months is in good working order.

General Home Heating Safety Tips:

  • Get your central heating system cleaned, inspected and serviced by a certified heating, venting and air conditioning contractor every year before using it. If you have a gas heater, make sure that you have a sufficient quantity of fully functioning carbon monoxide detectors installed in your home.
  • Make sure space heaters have at least three feet of empty space all around. Never place clothing or any other objects on a space heater to dry. Do not place space heaters near furniture or drapes. Turn space heaters off when leaving the room, house or before going to bed.

Family Fire Safety Tips:

  • Clear your roof and gutter of unnecessary buildup of debris, such as pine needles and leaves. Learn the outdoor burning regulations in your area, and do not engage in illegal burning of leaves and other outdoor debris.
  • Teach your kids how to respond in the event of a fire. Establish and practice a fire escape plan with your family that includes a designated meeting area outside the home. Make sure young children know how to dial 911. Make sure that there is a sufficient quantity of smoke detectors and fire extinguishers in your home, and that they are in working order. Do not leave lit candles unattended or place them where children can reach them. Do not leave cooking food unattended on the stove and make sure all flammable items are not near the stove.
  • There is nothing more important than the safety of your family. Everyone in your home needs to know how to behave responsibly to reduce the likelihood of experiencing a fire. However, because fires can start at any time without warning, it is also very important that the members of your household know how to react in the event of a fire.

Holiday Safety Tips:

  • Be careful with holiday decorations. Choose decorations that are flame resistant or flame retardant.
  • Keep lit candles away from decorations and other things that can burn.
  • Some lights are only for indoor or outdoor use, but not both.
  • Replace any string of lights with worn or broken cords or loose bulb connections. Connect no more than three strands of mini lights sets and a maximum of 50 bulbs for screw-in bulbs. Read manufacturer’s instructions for number of LED strands to connect.
  • Use clips, not nails, to hang lights so the cords do not get damaged.
  • Keep decorations away from windows and doors.

It’s a good idea to review fire prevention and safety tips with your family in the fall and throughout the year. Visit www.nfpa.org for more fire safety information.

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CALFIRE to lift El Dorado Counties Burn Permit Suspension on Monday November 9th 2015 at 8:00 am

 

CAL FIRE NEWS RELEASE

Camino- Effective Monday November 9th 2015 at 8:00 am the burn permit suspension in Amador, El Dorado, Alpine, and Sacramento Counties will be lifted. CAL FIRE Amador- El Dorado acting Unit Chief Brian Estes is formally cancelling the burn permit suspension and advises that those possessing current and valid agriculture and residential burn permits can now resume burning on permissible burn days. Agriculture burns must be inspected by CAL FIRE prior to burning until the end of the peak fire season. Inspections may be required for burns other than agriculture burns as well. This can be verified by contacting your local Air Quality Management District.

CAL FIRE burn permits will be required until the end of peak fire season. While cooler temperatures have helped to diminish the threat of wildfire, we are still in our fourth year of drought. Property owners and residents are asked to use caution while conducting debris or agriculture burns. Always use caution when burning, follow all guidelines provided, and maintain control of the fire at all times. Individuals can be held civilly and/or criminally liable for allowing a fire to escape their control and/or burn onto neighboring property.

Residents wishing to burn MUST verify it is a permissive burn day prior to burning by calling the appropriate number for your location;

South Lake Tahoe (530) 621-5842, (888) 332-2876

Pile Burning Requirements
• Only dry, natural vegetative material such as leaves, pine needles and tree trimmings may be burned.
• The burning of trash, painted wood or other debris is not allowed.
• Do NOT burn on windy days.
• Piles should be no larger than four feet in diameter and in height. You can add to pile as it burns down.
• Clear a 10 foot diameter down to bare soil around your piles.
• Have a shovel and a water source nearby.
• An adult is required to be in attendance of the fire at all times.
Safe residential pile burning of forest residue by landowners is a crucial tool in reducing fire hazards. State, Federal and Local land management and fire agencies will also be utilizing this same window of opportunity to conduct prescribed burns aimed at improving forest health on private and public lands.

For more information on burning, visit the CAL FIRE website at www.fire.ca.gov.

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