Lake Valley Fire Restrictions

Enhanced fire restrictions began June 15, 2021, and will remain in effect through November or until rescinded. Wood and charcoal fires and other fire-related activities are prohibited in the Lake Valley Fire Protection District. Increased fire danger due to severe drought conditions and warm weather is a big concern this summer. Enhanced fire restrictions will help reduce the possibility of human-caused fires.

Prepare your Community For Wildfire

By residing in the Wildland Urban Interface (the zone where natural environments intersect human development), we take on the extra responsibility of living with wildfire. 
However, living with wildfire at Lake Tahoe isn’t just an individual journey—it’s a team effort between ourselves, our neighbors, and federal, state, and local agencies. It is a partnership, and we all play a role.
May is National Wildfire Community Preparedness Day! Take time this month to prioritize wildfire preparedness and make a plan to lead, educate, organize, and engage your neighborhood this summer. Below are some ideas:
2019 defensible space community workday in the Golden Bear neighborhood, South Lake Tahoe.
Become a Tahoe Network Neighborhood Leader
Tahoe Network neighborhood leaders receive training and access to educational resources and event assistance. With support from the Tahoe Network and your local fire district, you can inspire and empower your community to get prepared.
  • If you’re interested in becoming a neighborhood leader, contact the Tahoe Network Fire Adapted Communities at fire@tahoercd.org or 530-543-1501 ext.114.
Educate Your Neighborhood
Organize Your Neighborhood
  • Compile neighborhood email addresses and contact information. Send out wildfire preparedness information, emergency updates, or newsletters.
  • Create a neighborhood communication thread, group, or forum on Facebook or Nextdoor focused on wildfire preparedness.
  • Discuss your neighbors’ evacuation plan. Identify if any neighbors will need extra assistance.
Engage Your Neighborhood
  • Plan a wildfire preparedness block party and invite your local fire district.
  • Plan a defensible space community workday.
  • Organize a tour of homes with exceptional defensible space and home hardening.
Apply for Firewise USA Recognition
Firewise USA is a national program that recognizes communities who are actively preparing for wildfire. You can join the eight other Firewise USA communities at Lake Tahoe and apply for your neighborhood to be recognized.
  • Form a committee that’s comprised of residents and other applicable wildfire stakeholders.
  • Obtain a written wildfire community risk assessment form your local fire district.
  • Develop an action plan with a prioritized list of risk reduction projects/investments for our neighborhood.
  • Host a defensible space community work day and an outreach event to educate neighbors on fire preparedness.

LVFPD Receives ISO Public Protection Classification 2

Press Release: LVFPD Receives ISO Public Protection Classification 2

Lake Valley Fire Protection District is proud to announce that effective September 1, 2014, the community served by the Fire District will have an ISO Public Protection Classification of 2 in areas with fire hydrants and 2Y for rural portions of the Fire District without fire hydrants.  The Fire District worked diligently over the last few years to reduce their community’s rating from a 5 to a 2. The Fire District is one of only 750 fire departments in the entire country to receive this designation.

The ramification of the new Public Protection Classification should be a significant reduction in fire insurance rates for all properties within Fire District boundaries.  Lake Valley Fire Protection District, Fire Chief Gareth Harris announced that “I am extremely proud of our hard working men and women who contributed countless hours towards reducing the risk rating for the community we proudly serve.”

The Insurance Services Office, Inc. better known as ISO, is a company that serves insurance companies by evaluating communities all over the country and assigning a risk classification ranging from the lowest risk being 1 to the highest being a 10. They rate communities based on three criteria: The fire department’s capabilities, the firefighting water supply, and the emergency communications capability.


September 21, 2012

RE: Lake Valley Fire Protection District, CA

Class 5/8B, effective 4/1/2012

Dear Constituents of of LVFPD :

ISO has completed its analysis of the structural fire suppression delivery system provided in your community. The resulting classification is indicated above.

The classification is a direct result of the information gathered, and is dependent on the resource levels devoted to fire protection in existence at the time of survey. This classification applies as follows:   Class 5 applies to all property within 5 road miles of the fire station and within 1000 ft to a fire hydrant; Class 8B applies to all property within 5 road miles of the fire station with or without a fire hydrant..   Although ISO maintains a pro-active process to keep baseline information as current as possible, in the event of changes, please call us at 1-800-444-4554, option 2 to expedite the update activity.

ISO is the leading supplier of data and analytics for the property/casualty insurance industry. Most insurers use PPC classifications for underwriting and calculating premiums for residential, commercial and industrial properties. The PPC program is not intended to analyze all aspects of a comprehensive structural fire suppression delivery system program. It is not for purposes of determining compliance with any state or local law, nor is it for making loss prevention or life safety recommendations.

If you have any questions about your classification, please let us know.

Sincerely,
Portia E. Stewart
Community Mitigation Analyst
(800) 444-4554 Option 2

Holiday Engine Schedule 2020

LAKE VALLEY FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT

HOLIDAY ENGINE SCHEDULE

Happy holidays from Lake Valley FPD! Here is the schedule for our Holiday engine to drive through our community neighborhoods. Unfortunately due to Covid 19, the Holiday engine will not be handing out candy canes this year. Please wave and say hello from a safe social distance. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call us!

  • December 11 – Echo View Estates, Tahoe Mountain Road, Mule Deer Circle
  • December 12 – Lake Tahoe Blvd from Boulder Mountain Drive to Grizzly Mountain Drive
  • December 13 – West side of North Upper Truckee from Zuni Street Highway 50, Chiapa Drive
  • December 14 – East side of North Upper Truckee from Grizzly Mountain to West San Bernardino Ave.
  • December 15 – Christmas Valley from Highway 50 to Grass Lake Road
  • December 16 –North side of Highway 50 in Meyers (lower Apache, Magnet School), behind Station 7     (Cornelian Drive, Navahoe Drive, Cheyenne Drive).
  • December 17 – North of Pioneer Trail from Highway 50 to Elks Club (Southern Pines Drive, Tionontati     Street, Meadow Vale Drive), Player Drive
  • December 18 – Upper Apache Drive and Mandan Street
  • December 19 – Pioneer Trail from Busch Way to Washoan Blvd (Glen Eagles Drive, Hekpa Drive)
  • December 20 – Pioneer Trail from Washoan Blvd to Jicarilla Drive (Apalachee Drive, Nadowa Street,        Susquehana Drive)
  • December 21 – Kokanee Estates (Marshall Trail, High Meadow Trail)
  • December 22 – Golden Bear Trail, Meadow View Estates (Plateau Circle, Cattleman’s Trail)
  • December 23 – Cold Creek Trail, Del Norte Street, Black Bart from Pioneer Trail to Meadow Crest Drive

Adopt a Hydrant Program

The Lake Valley Fire Protection District announces its “Adopt a Fire Hydrant” program.

The Lake Valley Fire Protection District has over 1000 fire hydrants within its borders. It is impossible for fire crews to shovel and maintain all of them in a timely manner. The California Fire Code addresses keeping fire hydrants free of obstructions and immediately identifiable.

The Lake Valley Fire Protection District strives to ensure all hydrants are clear, marked, and accessible in the event of a fire. Winter time makes this job very hard and during heavy snow the district is forced to clear key hydrants first. Some hydrants unfortunately may remain buried all winter.

The Fire District is asking community members to adopt the hydrant closest to their home or business and keep it clear of snow and debris so that together we can help to make our community safer. In the event of a small fire that is reported in a timely manner, the water carried by fire engines is usually sufficient. If a fire is too large for the water carried on an engine, a water source that is easily found can make a difference in keeping the fire from spreading to a neighboring property. Combining safe practices like installing smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, maintaining defensible space, and keeping your closest hydrant clear can prevent unnecessary property damage.

The Lake Valley Fire Protection District appreciates the members of our community that already maintain hydrants in their neighborhood and encourages everyone to participate.

If you notice a fire hydrant that is not marked with a snow stake please contact the Fire Marshal Chad Stephen at (530) 577-3737 or by email at stephen@lakevalleyfire.org.

When maintaining a hydrant, a three foot clear space should be maintained around the hydrant and to the roads edge. Below is an example of hydrants being cleared by helpful citizens of our community.

Lake Valley Fire Protection District, Fire Chief Brad Zlendick said that “the Fire District’s adopt a fire hydrant program is an important step in assuring that firefighters have access to an adequate water supply in the event of a fire”.

The Lake Valley Fire Protection District has its website at www.lakevalleyfire.org. Check out the website for information on the many services the Fire District is proud to offer to the community.

Fire restrictions lifted in South Lake Tahoe and Meyers

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. – A burn ban in the Lake Tahoe Basin was put in place this summer in response to the unprecedented and extreme fire conditions in California. While there were no major fires in the Basin there were record setting acres burned across the state.

A ban of charcoal barbeques, wood fire pits and open burning was but in place along with extra bans during Red Flag Warning conditions.

With the arrival of winter snow, South Lake Tahoe Fire Rescue and Lake Valley Fire Protection District have lifted the ban in the City of South Lake Tahoe and lake portion of El Dorado County. The Forest Service have not released their ban as of Tuesday morning.

● City of South Lake Tahoe – Charcoal BBQs and cooking fires are allowed. Natural Gas (NG) or Propane (LPG) outdoor firepits and barbecues, and pellet grills/smokers are allowed. Solid fuel recreational/warming fires and open burns are NOT allowed.

● Meyers and El Dorado County portions of the Lake Tahoe Basin – Charcoal BBQs and cooking fires are allowed. Natural Gas (NG) or Propane (LPG) outdoor firepits and barbecues, and pellet grills/smokers are allowed. Solid fuel recreational/warming fires are allowed in properly constructed or manufactured firepits. Open burning is still suspended until further notice.

Local South Lake Tahoe fire agency personnel are telling the public they appreciate their adherence to the recent fire restrictions, but ask they remain cognizant and report hazardous fires by dialing 9-1-1.

It is very important to follow manufacturer recommended instructions on the proper care and maintenance of barbecues and/or firepits.

For more information, contact South Lake Tahoe Fire Rescue at (530) 542-6160 or Lake Valley Fire Protection District (530) 577-3737.